How many Official Visits can a student-athlete take

Posted on September 5, 2016. Filed under: Baseball, Basketball, Basketball, Football, NCAA Sports, Softball, Track and Field, Volleyball | Tags: , , |

Is there a limit on the number of Official Visits a student-athlete can take?

August 25, 2016

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Here’s everything you need to know about Official Visits:

Funding?

If an institution pays for any part of a visit, it is considered an official visit. Typically the school will pay for travel, housing, meals and some entertainment costs.

•The school is allowed to pay for lodging, transportation, meals, and entertainment. That includes (1) round-trip transportation (rental car or airfare) for the student-athlete between home (or high school) and the campus, (2) you (and your parents) may receive 3 meals per day and (3) complimentary admissions to campus athletics events.
•Official visits cannot be made until the opening day of class senior year, no matter what division. The date will vary depending on your school.
•The NCAA allows 5 visits to D1 and D2 schools combined.
•You may only take ONE official visit per institution, no matter the division.
•Each official visit may be up to 48 hrs.
•The NCAA allows each school (DI, DII, and DIII) to offer official visits, but each school differs in policy and budget.
•Official visits are not allowed during dead periods.
•You are allowed an unlimited number of official visits to NAIA & D3 schools.

Who takes official visits?

Coaches usually offer official visits to their top recruits. You must be invited on an official visit by a coach; you cannot invite yourself on one.

How many official visits can a coach offer?

The number of official visits a college or team can offer depends on their budget each year. Division I schools usually can afford the most official visits, followed by Division II schools. NAIA and Division III colleges usually do not offer paid official visits, even though they are allowed to offer them.

How many official visits am I allowed to take?

Per NCAA rules, you are allowed to take no more than five official visits to Division I and/or Division II schools and you can only take one visit, per school. There is no limit on the number of official visits you can take at the Division III and NAIA levels, but you can only take one visit per school.

When can I take my first official visit?

You may begin to take official visits starting the opening day of classes, in your senior year of high school. You must also be registered with the NCAA Eligibility Center before you will be able to start taking official visits.

What does it mean if a coach offers me an official visit?

If a coach offers you an official visit, you are most likely very high on their list of recruits. Official visits are typically reserved for top recruits. If a coach does not offer you an official visit (especially at the Division I or II levels), you are most likely not very high on their recruiting list and you should look into other options.

How do I set up an official visit?

Coaches will usually extend an official visit offer during a phone conversation with you, but you do not have to wait for them to make the first move. It is okay to be upfront with the coach and ask him/her if they plan to offer you an official visit. Tell them that you are in the process of scheduling your official visits and you would like to know so you can plan accordingly. This will also show the coach that you are being seriously recruited at other places.

How do I know if a coach is offering an official visit vs. an unofficial visit?

Usually the coach will specify what type of visit they are offering you. If they don’t specify and they asked you to visit during your senior year, you should always ask them to clarify what type of visit it is.

Are there any common questions a coach may ask during an official visit?

Here are some common questions a coach may ask during your official visit:

What other schools are recruiting you?

Be honest and if possible, list colleges that are comparable to, rivals with, or better than the institution you are visiting. This will make them want to fight for you more!

What colleges will you visit?

Be honest and name any schools you have visited officially or unofficially. If this is the first college you have visited state that you are in the process of scheduling the rest of your visits.

When can you commit?

If you are visiting your number one choice and feel comfortable committing, go for it! If you have other visits pending or feel you need more time, tell the coach you want to take your other official visits, just to make sure you make an educated decision. Ask the coach, “How long does your offer stand for?” and “When do I have to make my decision by?” You can also explain to the coach that you need to discuss the offer with your parents, which can buy you some more time.

Will coaches be evaluating me during a visit?

Yes! Just because you are offered a visit, does not necessarily mean you will receive a scholarship offer or even a spot on the team. The coaching staff already has identified you as a top prospect, but the visit gives them an opportunity to judge your personality, lifestyle and character. Usually, coaches will make an effort to match recruits up with team members who have similar personalities and lifestyles. Be yourself, but remember, coaches are looking for young men and women who will be a positive asset to their university and team and who get along well with others. At some point during or after your visit, the coaches will probably ask your host about you, so always be courteous, positive and respectful.

Is there anything in particular that I should pay attention to while on my visit?

Make it a priority to get a good feel for the college as a whole. You need to evaluate the campus, the students, your prospective teammates and the coaches. Ask yourself, “Is this a place where I can see myself being comfortable and happy, for four years, even if I could not play my sport?”

Will I be offered a scholarship?

Sometimes coaches make offers during a visit, but this is not always the case. If a coach does not bring it up, it is okay to ask if you are being considered for a scholarship or if there are any academic scholarships you should look into.

Are student-athletes allowed to tryout or practice with the team?

As an NCAA rule, Division I and Division III schools do not allow tryouts. On an official or unofficial visit, you may participate in workouts that are not organized or observed by the coaching staff. Typically, the workout will be lead by the team’s captains and they must not be designed to test your athletic ability. Division II and NAIA schools are allowed to conduct one tryout, in the off-season of your sport, during your senior year.

Are there any times when visits are not allowed?

Yes. There are Dead Periods in which it is not permissible to make in-person recruiting contacts or evaluations on or off campus. Dead periods generally fall right before the signing periods.

Remember, coaches need to see how good you are before they’ll bring you on campus for a visit.

And for more, visit the NCAA web site for the official calendar

http://www.ncaa.org/student-athletes/resources/recruiting-calendars

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NCAA College Sports Glossary

Posted on July 31, 2012. Filed under: NCAA Sports, Sporting News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Glossary of terms commonly used by NCAA

Contact occurs any time a coach has any face-to-face contact with a prospective student-athlete or the prospect’s parents off the college’s campus and says more than hello. A contact also occurs if a coach has any contact with the prospective student-athlete or his or her parents at the prospective student-athlete’s high school or any location where the prospect is engaging in competition or practice.

Contact period is the time when a college coach may have in-person contact with a prospective student-athlete and the prospect’s parents on or off the college’s campus. The coach may also watch the prospective student-athlete play or visit his or her high school. The prospect and the parents may visit a college campus, and the coach may write and telephone during this period.

Cooperative principle imposes an affirmative obligation on NCAA member institutions (and their representatives) to assist the NCAA enforcement staff in developing full information about potential violations. An important element of this principle requires that all individuals who are subject to NCAA rules protect the integrity of an investigation and maintain confidentiality throughout the process. The enforcement staff is responsible for investigating potential rules violations; however, institutions and their representatives are also responsible for investigating potential infractions and reporting all relevant information to the enforcement staff.

Dead period is a time when the college coach may not have any in-person contact with the prospective student-athlete or the prospect’s parents at any time. The coach may write and telephone during this time.

Evaluation is an activity by a coach to evaluate a prospective student-athlete’s academic or athletics ability. This would include visiting the prospective student-athlete’s high school or watching the prospect practice or compete.

Evaluation period is the time a college coach may watch a prospective student-athlete play or visit the high school but cannot have any in-person conversations with the possible recruit or the parents off the college’s campus. The prospective student-athlete and the parents can visit a college campus during this period and a coach may call or write during this period.

Failure to monitor is a serious violation that is similar to lack of institutional control but considered less significant. Violations that result from a failure to monitor are usually limited in scope and do not involve widespread inadequacies in compliance systems and functions that are often found in lack of institutional control cases.

Institutional control is the efforts institutions make to comply with NCAA legislation and to detect and investigate violations that do occur. NCAA member institutions are obligated to maintain appropriate levels of institutional control.

Major violation is any violation that is not considered secondary.  Major infractions usually provide an extensive recruiting or competitive advantage.  Alleged major infractions are investigated by enforcement staff and can lead to severe penalties against the school and involved individuals.

National Letter of Intent is the document a prospective student-athlete signs when he or she agrees to attend the designated college or university for one academic year.  According to the terms of the National Letter of Intent program, participating institutions agree to provide athletics financial aid for one academic year to the student-athlete, provided he or she is admitted to the institution and is eligible for financial aid under NCAA rules. An important provision of the National Letter of Intent program is a recruiting prohibition applied after a prospective student-athlete signs a National Letter of Intent. This prohibition requires participating institutions to cease recruitment of a prospective student-athlete once a National Letter of Intent is signed with another institution.

Notice of allegations is a letter that informs senior leadership of the involved institution of the inquiry and requests its cooperation during the investigation. The notice is sent when the enforcement staff determines enough evidence exists to indicate major infractions.

Official visit is a prospective student-athlete’s visit to a college campus paid for by the college. The college can pay for transportation to and from the college, room and meals (three per day) while visiting and reasonable entertainment expenses, including three complimentary admissions to a home athletics contest. NCAA recruiting bylaws limit the number of official visits a recruit may take to five.

Postseason ban is a penalty applied only in the most egregious cases. The postseason ban prevents a team from participating in any postseason competition, including conference tournaments, NCAA championships and bowl games.

Prospective student-athlete is the title given when a student enters ninth grade. It also applies when, before a student’s ninth-grade year, a college gives the student, the student’s relatives or their friends any financial aid or other benefits that the college does not generally provide to prospective students.

Quiet period is a time when the college may not have any in-person talk with the prospective student-athlete or the parents off the college’s campus. The coach may not watch the prospect play or practice.The prospective student-athlete can visit college campuses during this time and a coach may write or telephone.

Repeat violators is when the status of a program if the Committee on Infractions finds a major violation has occurred within five years of the starting date of a major penalty.  For this provision to apply, at least one major violation must have occurred within five years after the starting date of the penalties in the previous case.

Secondary violation is an isolated or inadvertent violation that provides (or intends to provide) only minimal recruiting, competitive or other advantages. A secondary violation does not include extra benefits or any significant recruiting benefits. If an institution commits several secondary violations, they may collectively be considered a major violation. Secondary violations occur frequently and are usually resolved administratively.

Summary disposition is a cooperative process among the institution, involved individuals and the NCAA enforcement staff.  If these groups agree about the facts and the penalties presented in the report, an in-person hearing may be averted. The Committee on Infractions reviews the report in private and decides either to accept the findings and penalties or conduct an expedited hearing. An institution that would become a repeat violator cannot use the summary-disposition process and must go before the Committee on Infractions.

Unofficial visit is any visit by a prospective student-athlete and their parents to a college campus paid for by the prospective student athlete or the prospect’s parents. The only expense the prospective student-athlete can receive from the college is three complimentary admissions to a home athletics contest. The prospect may make as many visits as he or she likes and may take the visits at any time. The only time the prospective student-athlete cannot talk with a coach during an unofficial visit is during a dead period.

Verbal commitment is the phrase used to describe a college-bound student-athlete’s commitment to a school before he or she is able to sign a National Letter of Intent. A college-bound student athlete can announce a verbal commitment at any time. While verbal commitments have become popular, they are NOT binding on either the college-bound student-athlete or the school.

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