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When is the Best Time to Contact Coaches

Posted on September 7, 2017. Filed under: AAU, Baseball, Basketball, Basketball, Boys High School Basketball, Football, Girls High School Basketball, NCAA Sports, Sporting News, Sports Business, Track and Field | Tags: , |

When is the best time to contact a college coach?

September 2017

PrezRo
compiled by Prez Ro
follow back at @PrezRo365

So you want to contact a coach…. seems intimidating doesn’t it? First things that probably comes to mind is what do I say? Then you’re going to think, when is the best time to contact them.

Well, it really depends on how you are trying to contact him or her. If you are making a phone call, you should do it in the late afternoon or early evening. Coaches check their e-mail at different times, but we recommend e-mailing them in the morning; that way, they have all day to check their e-mail and see yours. If you are trying to contact a coach via social media, such as Facebook or Twitter, the best time to do that is in the late afternoon into evening hours. Now, let’s take a closer look.

 

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Calling a Coach
When you start planning to call a coach, it is extremely important you pay attention to the contact rules <LINK> for your sport; you can call a coach at any time, but they may not be able to call you back. To increase the chances they will pick up the phone, call a coach early in the evening, when they are most likely to have time to answer the phone. If they do not pick up the phone, it is extremely important that you leave a detailed message and tell them what day and time you plan on calling them back. It may be a time of the year that they are not allowed to call you back due to recruiting rules. If they know exactly when you plan on calling them, they can be prepared to take your call.

You should take steps to prepare yourself before you call a coach. Also, read these seven questions to ask when calling a coach for the first time.

E-mailing a Coach
Coaches can respond to an e-mail at any time, but it is a good practice to send your e-mails in the morning. This allows coaches all day to go through their e-mail account and respond. If they don’t respond to your e-mail after a few days, then send them a follow-up e-mail. If you still haven’t heard from them after following up, read this article for more help. You can also try these tips to get your e-mails opened.

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Using Social Media
Social media sites, such as Facebook and Twitter, are becoming increasingly popular in college sports. You should utilize them to get in touch with coaches. Late afternoon and early evening is a great time to contact coaches via social media. It gives them a chance to take care of their day-to-day coaching responsibilities before they start reaching out to recruits. Before contacting coaches on Facebook or Twitter, make sure you don’t have anything that would negatively affect your recruiting prospects.

NOTE: if you have a derogatory user name or wild nickname, you may want to change it before contacting a coach.

Do you have questions about contacting college coaches? Leave your questions in the comments section below or connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, or Google+!

 

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7 Questions to Ask When Calling a College Coach for the First Time

Posted on September 7, 2017. Filed under: AAU, Baseball, Basketball, Basketball, Boys High School Basketball, Football, Girls High School Basketball, NCAA Sports, Softball, Sporting News, Sports Business, Track and Field | Tags: , |

Be prepared when calling a coach…

September 2017

PrezRo
compiled by Prez Ro
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You’ve done all of your research on each program. You have the e-mail address and phone number for each coach.

Now what do you ask when you are actually talking to them? To help you prepare for calls with coaches, write out your questions ahead of time

That way you can make sure you cover all your bases and can easily take notes. The more you communicate with a coach, the easier it will be for you to figure out if you are both on the same page. Is there a connection between you and the coach? Do you feel comfortable? Is this someone you could imagine playing for? These are the type of questions you want to keep in mind as you are building that coach-recruit relationship.

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But what do you say when you are calling college coaches for the first time? Here are seven important questions to ask during the recruiting process:

What Does it Take to Earn a Scholarship With Your Program?
Knowing what it takes to earn a scholarship will help you with meeting the eligibility criteria. Many may not know it, but a major cause in not winning a scholarship is simply because people don’t meet the eligibility criteria. Did you know that missing an application deadline or not having a high enough GPA is an automatic disqualifier? There are millions of scholarships available, and you don’t have to be a rocket scientist, great writer, or have a 4.0 GPA to get one. Sometimes all it takes in meeting the eligibility criteria is being persistent.

Can I Meet With You if I Make an Unofficial Visit?
This is an important question because these visits are vital for coaches. They don’t want to burn any bridges with future recruits, so making an unofficial visit is common. Also, coaches don’t know if you’re going to blow up one day, and sometimes half the battle is getting an athlete on campus.

Where do You Typically Evaluate Your Recruits?

This is helpful so you get an idea on when or where they scout for athletes. Coaches view tapes, but they also scout talent at camps, tournaments, and showcases.

Do You Have Any Camps, Tournaments, or Showcases You Recommend I Attend?
This is the end goal when calling college coaches because your overall objective is to get evaluated. If they give you a recommendation, chances are they will be there.

How is Your Recruiting Class Looking For My Graduation Year?
This will help you evaluate your own abilities with respect to other top players in your recruiting class. There are hundreds of players who play at your level, so you have to distinguish yourself from the rest. Calling college coaches can help with this because it shows your interest in their program. Taking time out of your day to make a phone call can make a major impact.

What is the Best Way to Update You on My Progress?
Make it as convenient as possible for the coach to evaluate you. The more they start seeing you as and hearing about you, the greater your chances of being evaluated. You also want them to be updated on any special recognition, awards, etc.

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What Are Good Academic Goals for Your University?

This will help you stay on track with the university’s eligibility criteria. Coaches care about grades, so this shows that you care as well. It is also an excellent way for you to show your academic ability.

 

Do you have questions about contacting college coaches? Leave your questions in the comments section below or connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, or Google+!

 

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Understanding the Recruiting Process

Posted on September 7, 2017. Filed under: AAU, Baseball, Basketball, Basketball, Boys High School Basketball, Football, Girls High School Basketball, NCAA Sports, Sporting News | Tags: , |

Recruiting Overview…

September 2017

PrezRo
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The REAL Recruiting Game

If you live for sports. You’re an all-season athlete. Your teammates are your best friends. You’re also probably psyched (and a little nervous) about that mythical college recruitment process. Whether you’re a high school freshman or a senior, this is your college recruitment need-to-know introduction.

Making it to high school isn’t just a rite of passage for students and athletes alike—it’s also the start of a four-year athletic recruitment process. Believe it or not, the best of the best in their respective sports are already being scouted as early as freshman year.

Thanks to the National College Athletic Association (NCAA) and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), recruitment is a finely tuned animal, but it can still make your head spin with all of its intricacies. So grab your cleats, mouth guard, and uniform, and let’s dive in.

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NCAA vs. NAIA
The two main associations that govern collegiate athletics determine the process that you’ll be going through. Yet, it all starts with figuring out what you’re looking for in a school and in an athletic program. Take some time and ask yourself these questions: Do I want a public or private college or university? A big or small school? Do I need an athletic scholarship? Once you start thinking about those questions, your path and the schools that best fit your personality will become much clearer.

A basic difference between the NCAA and the NAIA is that the NCAA is the larger organization of the two, with over 1,000 affiliated colleges and universities; conversely, the NAIA has close to 300 participating member colleges and universities. NCAA schools also tend to be larger, and it includes the Ivy League, whereas NAIA schools fall on the smaller side. And just because the NCAA is better known doesn’t mean you won’t get the same athletic or academic experience at an NAIA school. In fact, NAIA schools are known to be the equivalent of a NCAA Division II school.

The divisions
NCAA Division I is home to those larger public schools that normally have huge arenas and fields that you have probably seen on television before—those schools with more than 15,000 students like University of Illinois or anything SEC. This division of sport is highly competitive and recruitment is not taken lightly by any means. Even though Division I is nationally recognized, it doesn’t mean you’re going to get that starting position you’re used to playing in high school. On the upside, however, Division I schools are so large that they tend to have a lot of money tucked away for their athletes.

Division II schools are split right down the middle in the public/private arena, which is great because it allows for an array of choices. These schools, according to NCAA.org, have on average about 4,500 students. It’s a nice mix of Division I and Division III athletics, and as far as money is concerned, more often than not, an athlete can walk away with at least a partial scholarship.

Last, but not least is NCAA’s Division III, the lesser known and perhaps more overlooked of the three. One of the big differences you’ll find playing a varsity sport in this division is affiliated schools do not offer athletic scholarships. When asked why students should choose a Division III school over a Division I or Division II school, many simply say, “top 50 national liberal arts college, provide an academic experience that is unique. For the right student who wants high-end academics and an athletic experience that is highly competitive, but not a job, we can be a better fit than many scholarship schools.”

It is important to note that the NCAA divisions are merely broken down by the number of athletic teams a school has. It is not a ranking system of how “good” a school is when it comes to athletics and academics.

Hitting the books
One myth that needs debunking: if you focus on and do well in your sports, grades and academics don’t matter—professors will treat you differently and let you “slide by” in your school work. False!

At the end of the day, you might even be a recruiter’s top choice, but if you don’t get into the school through the regular application process—whether it’s because your application is incomplete or your grades weren’t good enough—you will not be playing on that school’s team any time soon.

The high school years at a glance
The NCAA has specific rules for all its sports, making it difficult to list every intricacy between each division. While you can use the following information as a general guide, you should check out the NCAA website for the particulars of what needs to be done for your sport.

During freshman year of high school, your primary focus should be your academics, followed closely by working hard athletically. Take this time to peruse the NCAA site and learn about your sport and the different divisions. While you’re doing your research, start making a list of schools that stand out to you.

When sophomore year hits, start checking your mailbox for recruitment materials (e.g., questionnaires, camp brochures, etc.) and get your cell phone out! The process really begins when you find out which schools and coaches are interested in you. In most cases, you can now start contacting coaches in any of the divisions. They are not allowed to initiate contact with you at this point, so it’s all on you. You need to let coaches know that you are interested in them.

Sophomore year also marks the start of standardized testing. Get your feet wet by taking the PSATs, which will give you an idea of how the real SAT will go and show you where you need to improve before colleges see your scores. It’s important to stay ahead of the game and make your mark early. At the end of your sophomore year before school lets out, request a copy of your transcript and school profile. Send a copy of your transcript, any test scores you have, and your profile to each school you are interested in.”

When you finally reach junior year, it’s time to start getting serious. Believe it or not, college is right around the corner! Sign up for the SAT or ACT and get a head start, so if you don’t do so well the first time around, you can take them again. Talk to your guidance counselor about where you stand in your academics; they are one of the best resources you have available to you, since the NCAA rules are so strict about communicating with coaches.

And then there’s senior year. This is when everything starts happening. Coaches can now contact you more frequently and can ask you to come to the school on official visits. This is also a time when a coach can have you come for an evaluation of your skills, which often includes practicing with the team.

As actual athletics are concerned, coaches “really want to see recruits live to evaluate…. TRUE! It is very difficult to get a feel for the speed and size of the game on film. Seeing an athlete live can range from going to an actual game, or going to a summer clinic or camp, both of which were a huge help.

Getting noticed
There are many factors involved in getting noticed by a coach, including more than just your athletic ability and academic performance. In short, make sure you represent yourself in the best possible way, especially off the field including your digital footprint (social media).

At the end of the day, a coach wants the overall player and good person that they feel like they don’t have to truly babysit on a college campus.

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The end game
Don’t get caught up in the semantics of NCAA or NAIA, or making your way onto the “best” team. You’ll find yourself stuck in the process and losing sight of what you’re really after—a school that fits you. Just remember your goals, visit schools, do your research until you find your #1 draft pick college or university, and then everything else will fall into place.

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HS Freshmen – How to be prepared to be recruited

Posted on September 7, 2017. Filed under: AAU, Baseball, Basketball, Boys High School Basketball, Football, Girls High School Basketball, Sporting News, Sports Business | Tags: |

It’s not too early too early to think about recruiting as a freshmen

September 2017

PrezRo
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We recently published a general overview of the recruitment process for high school athletes to college <LINK>. With the new school year upon us, we wanted to expand on that article and get a little more in depth for freshman so they would know exactly what to do and expect as you prep for your college athletic career.

As a freshman athlete, senior year seems so so far away and makes you think you have so much time to get ready to be recruited. But, one dream killer is procrastination i.e. “I’ll get to it later.” Your four years in high school will go fast, faster than you realized so take advantage of each moment and opportunity, on the field as well as off.

But if you take it year by year, you will put yourself in the best position possible to be recruited and have a leg up.

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Decisions… things to think about
One of the great things about starting to prep in your freshman year is that you have to start thinking about where you want to go. You don’t have to make those life-altering decisions right now. All you have to do is think a little personal Q&A…ask yourself:

  • “What type of school do I want to go to? Big? Small? Religious?
  • DI?
  • DII?”
  • DIII?

Get a general idea of the schools that could possibly interest you. Remember that you want a school that will provide you with a great education and an athletic opportunity which could possibly save your parents money for school. Hopefully, your school is providing you access to third-party search tools like CommonApp.

By doing this all of this now, you’re creating a list of potential schools you can see yourself at four years from now. Not only that, you’re giving your parents and guidance counselor a great direction of where to focus their energies by giving them as much info as possible for continuing the college search, setting up campus visits, and more. When the time comes to actually start applying, the list will be a lot shorter and you’ll be 100% more confident that those schools are where you want to be—and this gives you extra time to explore and add other schools, if necessary.

Research
Take your list of schools and jump onto their websites to learn more about the sport(s) you are interested in and about the sport culture in general (i.e., the team, coaches, team record, schedule, etc.). If you live around any of these schools, take some time and go watch the level of play at a match one day. Seeing what the college level is like at such an early point in the process can only make you want to learn more and be better at your sport.

Another great way to conduct research is through attending sports camps. Coaches use camps to identify potential athletes at an early age. If you can figure out what camps your favorite coaches like to attend, sign up! The more time they get to watch you play, the better they will get to know you, and the better they can imagine you on their team.

Get to know your guidance counselor
While your guidance counselor is not a recruiter, they are there to truly help guide you through this whole process; they are your best resource this early in the game (no pun intended!).

In order to become a college athlete, you need to take the appropriate high school classes and thus, get your high school diploma. Meet with your guidance counselor at some point during your freshman year and map out your next three high school years with the right classes that will keep you on track. Keeping a good relationship with your counselor will also result in a much more personal recommendation as well.

What to expect freshman year
While I can’t outline every specific recruiting rule for each division and sport (see all the individual sport/division information for the NCAA here), there are general rules that still must be followed during your freshman year.

Surprisingly, according to the NAIA Recruiting Rules, there are no restrictions for students and coaches freshman year. Specifically, their rules for coaches state: “You are permitted to contact high school students as early as you would like to in their career—freshman, sophomore, junior year—that is all perfectly permissible, and you can contact them as many times as you think is appropriate in order to recruit the student to your institution.”

The NCAA, however, is not as lax as the NAIA, as it has restrictions galore throughout the high school years. Don’t expect coaches to be calling you and making you offers right now. The most you will probably get will be some questionnaires or brochures in the mail. If you absolutely need to talk to/introduce yourself to the coach, you can call them, but they cannot return the call. It’s a little one sided at the moment, but there are rules for a reason and they need to be followed.

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I know, I know. A lot of the above doesn’t sound all that exciting. I mean, what are you doing to really get yourself recruited? You’re just starting the journey, so all you need to do this year is work on making the team, getting good grades, and start thinking about college. As you progress through each high school year, you’ll see how everything adds up.

Hey sophomores, you’re up next! Leave some questions in the comments and I’ll make sure to answer them in your next blog.

 

 

 

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2016 September ASNN365 Newsletter

Posted on November 7, 2016. Filed under: AAU, Basketball, Boys High School Basketball, Football, Girls High School Basketball, NCAA Sports, Sporting News, Sports Business |

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School is in… Protect yourself sociably…

September 2016

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COMMENTARY: As schools begin around the country the Next Wave of the Digital Divide… Nearly a third of Americans have trouble navigating the Internet, says one researcher.

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Protect Yourself On Social Media

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QUOTE: Just because you think it – that doesn’t mean you need to TWEET it! 

MUST READ: Did You Know Colleges Monitor Players…

NOTE: To all HS players on my TL, if ur tweeting profanity/inappropriate language (this includes retweets) ur not getting an offer from us

bluearrow Student-athletes need to pay attention to their social media footprints… 

Social Media & Recruiting- 16 Tips:  Just b/c people ask your opinion on emotional/hot topic, don’t have to answer

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bluearrow MUST SEE: The Donovan Hill Story

bluearrow BONUS on Donovan Hill…

bluearrow Atlanta-area high school video board

bluearrow Do you think College Athletes should be paid?

college

bluearrow When is the best time to contact college coaches?

Top records this decade by percentage (%)
1. Alabama 72-10 88%
2. Oregon 69-12
3. Ohio St 68-12
4. Florida St 68-14
5. Stanford 66-15
6. Boise St 64-15

bluearrow  NCAA outlaws a very specific type of subtweeting in recruiting

bluearrow NCAA Vocab: What is a National Letter of Intent?

bluearrow Need-to-Know Rule Changes for 2016 College Football Season

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bluearrow How we got football…

bluearrow VIDEO W/new virtual reality technology, playing QB may never be the same

          

 

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McDonald All-American Games

Posted on October 29, 2012. Filed under: AAU, Basketball, Basketball, Boys High School Basketball, Girls High School Basketball | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

High School Basketball best is Chicago-bound at least for a few years….

August 2012

McDonald’s announced on Wednesday that the boys and girls All American Games will stay in Chicago at the United Center through 2015, with an option for 2016.

Bottom line, the fans keep turning out to watch the best-of-the-best in high school basketball.

“Fans throughout the U.S. can now make Chicago their destination to see the greatest high school basketball players participate in this annual rite of passage,” Douglas Freeland, director of the games, said in a release.

According to McDonald’s, Chicago ranks first in average attendance with 17, 388 in the three years it has hosted the game (1982, 2011, 2012). Philadelphia is a distant second with 11,610 in two years hosting.

The 2013 game will take place on April 3. Tickets will be available in January and the rosters will be announced in February.

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201 Baseball Bat Rules

Posted on July 16, 2012. Filed under: AAU, Baseball, Sporting News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

New amended rules…

July 2012

New language has been added to the high school baseball rules to re-emphasize that non-wood bats cannot be altered.

This additional note in Rule 1-3-2 was one of four rules changes approved by the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) Baseball Rules Committee at its June 3-5 meeting in Indianapolis. All rules changes were subsequently approved by the NFHS Board of Directors.

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Title IX turns 40

Posted on July 11, 2012. Filed under: AAU, Basketball, Girls High School Basketball, Sporting News, Sports Business | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Title IX turns 40 – June 23, 1972

June 2012

It’s just 37 words, 37 plain and grammatically clunky words hiding inside a large education bill, 37 words that didn’t seem to be a big deal at the time, 37 words that would change everything:

“No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any educational program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”

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Difference between GOOD and GREAT

Posted on July 11, 2012. Filed under: AAU, Baseball, Basketball, Boys High School Basketball, Football, Girls High School Basketball, High School Basketball, Sporting News, Sports Business | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Difference between GOOD and Great…

a conversation needed right now

July 3, 2012

One of the words that are way overused in our society is the term “Great”. Everyone wants to just throw that term on the table without evaluating the traits that make up the word. It’s a joke how people like throwing this word around like they giving out change in a toll-booth. To be great at anything it means that you have established yourself in an elite status of your peers.

In the basketball community, that term is very popular when evaluating a prospect at the high school, college, and pro levels. From a player, coach, and scouting perspective that is a word that should be used when characterizing an elite player and not just a player that has some talent.

Too many young players in this country are set up for failure because of people proclaiming them being of the game’s elite when they are merely just good players. Who are these people? Usually scouts, coaches, and other basketball people that are trying to discover the next great one. I have no doubt that their intentions are good, but what happens is it instills bad habits in players and gives them a false sense of self value. What usually happens is many other players catch up to them and they have no idea how to work their way out. Great player sometimes dominate from a young age, but a big percentage peak later in their careers. The word great can be a very powerful thing that can impact a player greatly in a positive as well as a negative one.

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Boys Class of 2014

Posted on June 18, 2012. Filed under: AAU, Basketball, Boys High School Basketball | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Top 10 Players from the Class of 2014

June 2012

Here is our TOP 10 Players from the Boys classes of 2014 to watch during the AAU circuit…

Visit www.amateursports365.com/basketball/2014-Boys-Prospects.html

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